Wildlife Research Center Seminars

On Wednesdays in the basement (lower ground) floor of Wildlife Research Center, Kyoto University *
* Unless otherwise specified.

If you want to join this seminar, please email to seminar



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October 11, 2017
Conservation in Kibale National Park 

Date and Time: October 11 (Wed) 15:30-17:30
Venue: Seminar Room, Wildlife Research Center
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October 11, 2017 Aoi Matsukawa 
The Burrow structure of porcupines in Bornean tropical rain forests
Wildlife Research Center Seminar

Date: October. 11th 2017 (Wed) 13:30-15:30
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html

Speaker: Aoi Matsukawa

The Burrow structure of porcupines in Bornean tropical rain forests

Three species of porcupine live in the tropical rain forests of Borneo. Because the species dig the largest and most complex burrow in this area, their burrows may provide important hiding spaces for small animals at the forest floor. In this seminar, we will present the structure of porcupine burrow and the animals using them.

Upcoming seminar
10/18(Wed) Canceled
10/25(Wed) Maegan Fitzgerald / Sota Inoue
11/1(Wed) Self introductions of guest researchers/students
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October 04, 2017 Nachiketha Sharma Ramamurthy 
Behavioral and vocal responses of Asian elephants to different source of disturbances

Wildlife Research Center Seminar

Date: October. 4th 2017 (Wed) 13:30-
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html

Nachiketha Sharma Ramamurthy

*Behavioral and vocal responses of Asian elephants to different source of
disturbances*

The rapid growth in human-elephant conflicts is an issue of major concern
among many biologists and conservationists. Besides assessing the influence
of man-made threats or perturbations, addressing how elephants are
responding to such changes and adapting to it, is essential for their
welfare and management. Understanding the cognitive abilities of elephants
in modified landscapes, then, could help in improvising and developing the
effective conflict mitigation strategies. Hence, to understand how
elephants respond to different forms of disturbances including human
presence, we conducted a study on free-ranging Asian elephants of the
Mudumalai Tiger Reserve. In this presentation, I will be discussing, my
preliminary findings on how Asian elephants respond to different source of
disturbances and future directions of my study.

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今後のセミナー予定
10/11(水) 松川あおい
10/18(水) 休み
10/25(水) Maegan Fitzgerald / 井上漱太

Upcoming seminar
10/11(Wed) Aoi Matsukawa
10/18(Wed) Canceled
10/25(Wed) Maegan Fitzgerald / Sota Inoue

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July 19, 2017 Mi Yeon Kim 
Introduction to Jeju Island and 2017 Research Plan
Wildlife Research Center Seminar

Date: July.19th 2017 (Wed) 13:30-
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html

Mi Yeon Kim 

「Introduction to Jeju Island and 2017 Research Plan」

[Introduction to Jeju Island]
Indo-pacific bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops aduncus, is known to widely distribute in warm temperate and tropical waters, from South Africa in the west, along the rim of the Indian Ocean to the southern half of Japan and coastal waters of Australia in the east. A fairly unknown population of T. aduncus is found in the largest island of the Korean peninsula, Jeju Island (Jeju dolphin). The population size of 114 dolphins are restricted to inshore habitat around the island, and exhibit geographical isolation with other populations. Previous research on this population was limited to occurrence and abundance. In this presentation, I will briefly introduce Jeju Island and current research.
[2017 Research Plan]
Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin is generalist predator feeding on local prey population, and exhibit a variety of foraging strategies depending on the prey type and habitat. Jeju dolphin show foraging during the day and their foraging strategy range from individual hunting to highly coordinated group hunting. Foraging strategy also includes dolphin vocalization that mediates complex social behavior, and navigation while obtaining environmental information. The research plan for this year is to investigate and define foraging strategies that are used by Jeju dolphin according to prey type and group composition. Then foraging vocalization will be investigated depending on the foraging strategy.

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July 12, 2017 Yutaro Sato 
Research plan: cognitive experiments with chimpanzees and bonobos using touchscreen, eye-tracker, and thermo-camera
Wildlife Research Center Seminar

Date: July. 12th 2017 (Wed) 13:30-
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html


■Yutaro Sato■ (Chair: Kei Matsushima)

「Research plan: cognitive experiments with chimpanzees and bonobos using touchscreen, eye-tracker, and thermo-camera」

I plan to conduct cognitive studies with chimpanzees and bonobos in Kumamoto Sanctuary (KS) and I have been working there since June. In this seminar, I would report my current work and talk about my research plan. I plan to use touchscreens, an eye-traker, and an infrared thermo-camera. By using an eye-tracker, we can investigate great ape's cognition such as how to direct attention to stimulus or anticipatory look. An infrared thermo-camera is a non-invasive tool to measure animals' body temperature based on which we can estimate their emotional state. I will try to examine great ape's psychology from multiple view points by using these techniques. Now I am trying to establish the way to perform experiments with these tools.

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Upcoming seminar
7/19 (Wed) Mi Yeon KIM
7/26 (Wed) Aoi Matsukawa 
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July 05, 2017 Kasumi Sakakibara 
Using Drones for observing the behavior in small cetaceans
Wildlife Research Center Seminar

Date: July. 5th 2017 (Wed) 13:30-
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html

■Kasumi Sakakibara■ (Chair: Hiroko Sakuragi)

「Using Drones for observing the behavior in small cetaceans」
About 60 % of wild Finless porpoises (Neophocaena asiaeorintalis) are found to travel in a small group size between one and three. However, during feeding activities the number of Finless porpoises changes according to the population and location of fish school. As size of fish school increases the number of Finless porpoise participating in the feeding increases. However, there are only few studies that looked into the feeding behavior and existence of group feeding in Finless porpoise. In our study, we used drone to observe foraging behaviors and observe continuous feeding episodes. I will talk about the analysis methods for the drone video of Finless porpoise feeding behavior and preliminary results. I would also like to discuss the use of same technology and method on the swimming formation of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins.

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Upcoming seminar
7/12 (Wed) Sato (M1)
7/19 (Wed) Mi Yeon KIM 
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June 28, 2017 Kei Matsushima 
Research Plan: Wildlife monitoring at saltlicks in Malay Peninsula using environmental DNA (with pre-survey result)
Wildlife Research Center Seminar

Date: June. 28th 2017 (Wed) 13:30-
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html

■Kei Matsushima■

"Research Plan: Wildlife monitoring at saltlicks in Malay Peninsula using environmental DNA (with pre-survey result)"

Environmental DNA is useful for detection of terrestrial mammals. I will show the research plan on eDNA survey from saltlicks in Malay Peninsula with the result of pre-survey.

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Upcoming seminar
7/5 (Wed) Sakakibara
7/12 (Wed) Sato (M1)
7/19 (Wed) Mi Yeon KIM 
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June 21, 2017 Hideki Sugiura 
Long-term observation of population parameters in wild Japanese macaques in Yakushima

Wildlife Research Center Seminar

Date: June. 21th 2017 (Wed) 13:30-
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html


■Hideki Sugiura■

Long-term observation of population parameters in wild Japanese macaques in Yakushima

Hideki SUGIURA, Naoki AGETSUMA, Yoshimi AGETSUMA- YANAGIHARA, Shiho FUJITA, Toshiaki TANAKA, Mariko SUZUKI, Kana AIBA, Hiroki KODA, Makiko HARASAWA, Yasuyuki MUROYAMA, Momoko SHIMIZU, Tatsuro KAWAZOE, Akiko SAWADA, Yoko SUGIURA, Takayuki ASAI, Shuhei HAYAISHI, Ritsuko KOBAYASHI, Wataru GOSHIMA,

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Upcoming seminar
6/28 (Wed) Matsushima
7/5 (Wed) Sakakibara
7/12 (Wed) Sato (M1)
7/19 (Wed) Mi Yeon KIM 
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June 14, 2017 Moe Yanagi 
Comparison of feeding habits between African savanna elephants, forest elephants and hybrids in Kibale National Park, Uganda

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Wildlife Research Center Seminar


Date: June 14th 2017 (Wed) 13:30-
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html



■Moe Yanagi■ (Chairperson: Dr. Muramatsu)


Comparison of feeding habits between African savanna elephants, forest elephants and hybrids in Kibale National Park, Uganda


There are two species of African elephants : savanna elephant Loxodonta africana and forest elephant L. cyclotis. These two species can be distinguished genetically, morphologically and ethologically. Previous study showed hybridization between forest and savanna elephants in some areas, especially around the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) - Uganda border. Many areas along the border including the Albertine Rift have had a long history of high-density human occupation and their poaching. Increase of transboundary elephant movement between Uganda and DRC and hybridization may result from human pressures. I would like to conduct census to quantify the relative abundance of elephants and their habitat use in Kibale National Park, Uganda. I also would like to confirm their diet by stable isotope analysis from dung samples, then compare with the results from their genetic analysis so that we can evaluate the relationship between their genetic information and their diet.


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Upcoming seminar
6/21 (Wed) Prof. Sugiura
6/28 (Wed) Matsushima
7/5 (Wed) Sakakibara
7/12 (Wed) Sato (M1)
7/19 (Wed) Mi Yeon KIM


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June 07, 2017 Momoko Oka 
Environmental Enrichment for captive tigers and its application to promote visitors’ interest in animals

Wildlife Research Center Seminar


Date: June 7th 2017 (Wed) 13:30-
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html


■Momoko Oka■ (Chairperson: Dr. Kinoshita)


Environmental Enrichment for captive tigers and its application to promote visitors’ interest in animals


The purpose of my graduation study was to clarify the reproductive cycle and the estrous cycle of the sumatran tiger to promote the captive breeding at zoo. I compared the fecal concentrations of steroid hormones and the behaviors. Androstenedione were found to be reliable indicators of the estrous cycle. From now, I am planning to study about the validity of the environmental enrichment for captive tigers. Additionally, I will also investigate whether the enrichment can promote visitors’ interest and understanding of animals.
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Upcoming seminar
6/14 (Wed) Yanagi
6/21 (Wed) Dr. Sugiura

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May 30, 2017
The 6th International Seminar on Biodiversity and Evolution: Wildlife Science by New Biologging studies 

Date and Time:
Tuesday May 30, 2017. 9:00 - 18:30

Venue:
Science Seminar House, North Campus of Yoshida Campus, Kyoto University
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May 24, 2017 Kodzue Kinoshita 
Introduction of studies on breeding in orangutans and chimpanzees which I had conducted at Primate Research Institute
Reiko Takizawa 
Designation of Yanbaru National Park and land use of the forest by local people

Wildlife Research Center Seminar

Date: May. 24th, 2017 (Wed) 13:30-
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html

■Kodzue Kinoshita■

Introduction of studies on breeding in orangutans and chimpanzees which I had conducted at Primate Research Institute

I will present three introductions of breeding research that I had conducted at Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University for two and a half years until this March. The first one is the differences of leucine aminopeptidase and sex steroid hormone concentrations between a stillbirth and live births in Bornean orangutan. The second one is the change of sex steroid hormone concentration in a chimpanzee whose estrus returned early after birth. And the last one is the difference of semen characteristics between Borneo orangutan and chimpanzee.


■Reiko Takizawa■

Designation of Yanbaru National Park and land use of the forest by local
people


Upcoming seminar
5/30 (Tue) CET Bio International Seminar
5/31 (Wed) No seminar
6/7 (Wed) Oka-san
6/14 (Wed) Yanagi-san
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May 17, 2017 Dr. Sherif Ramadan 
DNA polymorphism of Androgen receptor gene (AR) is associated with fear responses in camel (Camelus dromedarius)

Wildlife Research Center Seminar

Date: May.17th 2017 (Wed) 13:30-
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html

◼︎Dr. Sherif Ramadan◼︎ Chairperson: Hiroko Sakuragi

DNA polymorphism of Androgen receptor gene (AR) is associated with fear responses in camel (Camelus dromedarius)

Camel is an important livestock species in many regions of the world. It can be used for milk, meat and wool production, for transportation, racing contests, tourism, agricultural work, and for beauty contest. Reduced fear and increased tolerance for stress were assumed to have been an early prerequisite for the successful domestication of all species including camels. Fear greatly influences health, quality of life and social interactions. Genetic markers for behavioural characteristics have already been identified in different livestock species. Androgens reduce fear reactions in human and different animals and this was proved by injections of exogenous testosterone. Melanin-based coloration is often associated with variation in physiological and behavioural traits and this association stems from pleiotropic effects of the genes regulating body coloration. In this study, we found DNA polymorphisms (16, 17, 18 and 19 repeat) in the glutamine repeat in the androgen receptor gene (ARQ repeat) and one non-synonymous (C/T) SNP in exon1 of the tyrosinase gene (TYR) which resulted in an amino acid substitution (Pro/Leu). We examined the association between both of ARQ repeat and (C/T) SNP of TYR gene polymorphisms with fear response in dromedary camel. We assessed the fear response of 32 individuals to the approach of an unfamiliar person and 33 individual camels to a novel object (a red Pilate’s ball) tests based on videos recording for each behavioural test. Results showed that there was a significant association of AR polymorphism with camel fear response with a trend that individuals carrying shorter genotypes (16 Q repeat) recorded greater fear responses to both tests, while (C/T) SNP of the TYR gene showed non-significant association. This study is a first step in the identification of potential genetic markers associated with camel personality. However, many other genes involved and affect camel personality, so investigating more genes affecting camel personality are eagerly anticipated.
◼︎◼︎

Upcoming seminar
5/24 (Wed) Dr. Kinoshita, Takizawa-san
5/30 (Tue) CET Bio International Seminar
5/31 (Wed) No seminar
6/7 (Wed) Oka-san
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May 10, 2017 Self Introduction 

2017年5月10日(水)13:30~@野生動物研究センター地下1階会議室
(場所は以下をご参照ください。)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html

来週の野生動物研究センター(WRC)のセミナーでは、海外からの招聘学生のみなさまに自己紹介をしていただきます。

今後のセミナー予定
5/17 (水) ラマダンさん
5/24 (水) 木下さん、滝澤さん(野生動物学特論)
5/30 (火) CET Bio国際セミナー
5/31 (水) お休み

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Wildlife Research Center Seminar

■Self introduction by students from foreign countries■

Date: 10th May 2017 (Wed) 13:30-
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html

Upcoming seminar
5/17 (Wed) Dr. Ramadan
5/24 (Wed) Dr. Kinoshita, Takizawa-san
5/30 (Tue) CET Bio International Seminar
5/31 (Wed) No seminar
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April 26, 2017 Hiroko SAKURAGI 
Wild Chimpanzee Mothers and Nonmothers are Attentive to Infants at Onset of Travel

Wildlife Research Center Seminar
Date: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 (13:30-)
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html

■Hiroko SAKURAGI■

Wild Chimpanzee Mothers and Nonmothers are Attentive to Infants at Onset of Travel

Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have a fission-fusion group pattern, meaning an individual could travel alone or with other group members. The only members within a community (or unit-group) that always travel together are mother-infant pairs. Certain pairs have a third member traveling with them most of the time, if not at all times, making them a triad. An older sibling of the infant or a close associate of the mother would be the third member. It could be assumed that a mother, who would likely avoid endangering her infant’s life, would not leave it when she starts to travel. If she does, wouldn’t that be when certain other individuals are available – individuals that she can expect to attend to her child? In chimpanzees, older siblings and nulliparous young females are known to show caretaking behavior toward infants, such as carrying. Those individuals overlap with the third members of triads described above. In this study, a mother’s preceding distance from her infant at the onset of travel was found to be large in the following order: 1) triads; third member was closer to the infant than the mother, 2) pairs (no third members exist), 3) triads; third member was farther from the infant than the mother. I also found that the larger the mother’s preceding distance was, the more the third member tended to wait for the infant. The former result suggest that mothers precede their infants at the onset of travel being aware that the third member is able to attend to the infant, and that they expect the third member to behave appropriately. The latter result suggest that third members are aware of both the mother’s and infant’s situations, and that they flexibly adjust their behaviors if necessary. This study was conducted in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania. The study period was from November 2016 to January 2017. Focal animals were 12 mother-infant pairs.
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April 19, 2017 Miho Tanaka 
Wounds of wild indo pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus)

Wildlife Research Center Seminar
Date: April 19th, 2017 (Wed) 13:30-
@Wildlife Research Center B1 floor
(Please see the map below.)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html

■Miho Tanaka■ Chairperson Matsushima

Wounds of wild indo pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus)

We can find many wounds and scars on the body of wild dolphins. These wounds and scars could be an information source to understand ecology and behavior of wild dolphins that is difficult to observe directly. For example, we might estimate their habitat use in nighttime and aggressive social interaction from these wounds and scars. In this study, we studied crater-like wounds and white scars on the body of the wild indo-pacific bottlenose dolphin formed by cookie-cutter sharks (CCS, isistius brasiliensis) and by conspecific dolphins. We studied wild indo-pacific bottlenose dolphin around Mikura Island, Tokyo. In this area, long-term identification surveys were conducted using video records. We collected images of newly formed wounds from the video records between 2013-2016 and examined morphological changes of each wounds during the study period.
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April 12, 2017 Safety Drill 

2017年4月12日(水) 15:10~ @野生動物研究センター地下1階会議室
(場所は以下をご参照ください。)
http://www.wrc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/map.html

安全講習会をおこないます。
普段とは開始時刻が異なり、15時10分からです。
ご注意ください。