Nahoko Tokuyama

Nahoko Tokuyama

Assistant Professor, Wildlife Research Center

日本語で表示
Why do we still want to be with and communicate with someone even when you can live by yourself? I have been having this question since my adolescence, which led me to study social interactions in group-living animals. I have been studying wild bonobos at Wamba, Luo Scientific Reserve, DR Congo since 2011. My research focuses on within-group female cooperation and aggregation, as well as social interactions across groups. I also started observing wild chimpanzees at Kalinzu forest, Uganda in 2016.
Biography
  • 2022-
    Assistant Professor, Wildlife Research Center, Kyoto University
  • 2020-2022
    Assistant Professor, The Center for International Collaboration and Advanced Study in Primatology (CICASP), Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University

    Working at Wildlife Research Center, Kyoto University

  • 2017-2020
    JSPS research fellow (SPD), The Graduate University for Advanced Study (Sokendai)
  • 2016-2017
    Research fellow, Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University
  • 2016
    Ph.D. in Science, Primate Research Institute, Department of Science, Kyoto University
  • 2013
    MA in Science, Primate Research Institute, Department of Science, Kyoto University
  • 2011
    BA in Science, Department of Science, Kyoto University

Research achievements
Peer-reviewed papers
Book chapters
  • Yamamoto S, Tokuyama N, Clay Z, Hare B (2019). Chimpanzee and Bonobo. In: Choe, J.C. (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior, (2nd ed.). vol. 1, pp. 324–334. Elsevier, Academic Press.
  • Sakamaki T, Behncke I, Laporte M, Mulavwa M, Ryu H, Takemoto H, Tokuyama N, Yamamoto S & Furuichi T (2015). Intergroup transfer of females and social relationships between immigrants and residents in bonobo (Pan paniscus) societies. In Furuichi T, Yamagiwa J & Aureli F (eds.), Dispersing Primates Females, Springer, pp127-169.